Category Archives: Ovarian Cancer

Brief: WebMD publishes a very useful interview on the link between talcum powder use and cancer

It has been a busy couple of months for me, with several projects that have required juggling, so I have not been able to post anything on Women’s Health issues. However, given the most recent verdict against Johnson & Johnson on a case filed by a woman with Ovarian Cancer, resulted in Millions of Dollars being awarded to her.

Any time this happens, of course, it causes a stir, as it should. However, I am not going to spend time on this post talking about the merits of courts allowing companies like J&J and many of the drug companies try to get away by not fighting lawsuits as a class, etc. Those discussions are for my other blog, and will go on for a long time. Plus, in this case, we cannot prove a causal relationship between talcum powder use and cancer, yet.

So, I want to touch very briefly on three takeaways from the interview, and suggest you get the rest from the horse’s mouth:

  1. Correlation is not always a result of causation. We may never find lasting proof that talcum powder use causes cancer. This is an important thing to remember.
  2. There appears to be no medical benefit at all from using talcum powder.
  3. So, given the correlation and the lack of any benefit, it is best to stop using talcum powder! This is what the Doctor interviewed in the article suggests! Sound advice, it would appear!

Please read the rest here: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/884700?pa=Vor1qEPNxHeNOj5AKsX1Hl55HifEoXQauwdv%2BVDi5uqIdvEbMsfStGAJbHUGqkcC8SIvl8zjYv73GUyW5rsbWA%3D%3D

Image, Courtesy, Pexels: https://www.pexels.com/photo/rear-view-of-woman-with-arms-raised-at-beach-during-sunset-320007/

Interesting MIT Research on Ovarian Cancer Detection

The teal ribbon, pictured above, is used to represent the Fight Against Ovarian Cancer

I am back to my favorite Qmed today. They led me to a neat article on MIT News.

Ovarian cancer, while rare, still affects a number of women. According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI – link below), approximately 1.3 % of women will be diagnosed to cancer during their lifetime, and in 2014, they approximated that 222,060 women were living with Ovarian Cancer in the United States.

In addition, as detailed both in the Qmed Article and MIT News (links below), Ovarian Cancer detection is challenging, and usually detection doesn’t occur well after the disease has reached a certain size.

Consequently, this represents an important challenge in healthcare, and with the support of some much needed funding and the investment of great scientific minds, MIT might have used synthetic biomarkers, that, if transferred successfully from the current mouse models to humans, can shave diagnostics time by about 5 months! And five months, can definitely mean a lot for disease detection, treatment and/or management.

Read more about synthetic biomarkers, the challenges with Ovarian Cancer detection, and other interesting information through the links below.

References: 

  1. The Qmed Article: http://www.qmed.com/mpmn/medtechpulse/better-way-find-ovarian-cancer?cid=nl.x.qmed02.edt.aud.qmed.20170503
  2. The MIT News Article: http://news.mit.edu/2017/new-technology-detect-tiny-ovarian-tumors-0410
  3. Some NCI stats on Ovarian Cancer: https://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/ovary.html